How the difference types of biofertilizers difference



How the difference types of biofertilizers difference


Rhizobium



  Rhizobium is a soil habitat bacterium, which can able to live in roots and fixes the atmospheric nitrogen. The physiology of Rhizobium will vary from free-living condition to the bacteroid of nodule. They are the most efficient biofertilizer by quantity of nitrogen fixed  compare with other fertilizer. They have seven genera and highly specific to form nodule in legumes, referred as cross inoculation group.  Rhizobium inoculant was first made in USA and commercialized by private enterprise in 1930s


Azotobacter



  Of the several species of Azotobacter, A. chroococcum happens to be the dominant inhabitant in arable soils capable of fixing N2 (2-15 mg N2 fixed /g of carbon source) in culture media. The bacterium produces  slime which helps in soil aggregate. The numbers of A. chroococcum in soils rarely exceeds 105/g soil due to lack of organic matter and the presence of antagonistic microorganisms in soil.






Azospirillum

 Azospirillum lipoferum and A. brasilense are primary inhabitants of soil, the rhizosphere and intercellular spaces of root cortex of graminaceous plants. They perform the associative symbiotic relation with the graminaceous plants.  The bacteria of Genus Azospirillum are  N2 fixing organisms isolated from the root and above ground parts of a variety of crop plants. They are Gram negative, Vibrio or Spirillum having abundant accumulation of polybetahydroxybutyrate (70 %) in cytoplasm. 
Five species of Azospirillum described as A. brasilense, A.lipoferum, A.amazonense, A.halopraeferens and A.irakense.  The organism proliferates under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions but it is preferentially micro-aerophilic in the presence or absence of combined nitrogen in the medium. Apart from nitrogen fixation, growth promoting substance production (IAA), disease resistance and drought tolerance are some of the additional benefits due to Azospirillum inoculation.




Cyanobacteria



  Both free-living as well as symbiotic cyanobacteria (blue green algae) have been harnessed in rice cultivation. A composite culture of BGA having heterocystous Nostoc, Anabaena, Aulosira. is given as primary inoculum in trays, polythene lined pots and later mass multiplied in the field for application as soil based flakes to the rice growing field at the rate of 10 kg/ha. The final product is not free from extraneous contaminants and not very often monitored for checking the presence of desiredalgal flora.
Once so much announce as a biofertilizer for the rice crop, it has not presently attracted  of the rice growers. The benefits due to algalization can be to the extent of 20-30 kg N/ha under ideal conditions but the labour oriented methodology for the preparation of BGA biofertilizer is in itself a limitation. Quality control measures are not usually followed except perhaps for random checking for the presence of desired species qualitatively.





Azolla
  Azolla is a free-floating water fern that floats in water and fixes atmospheric nitrogen associate with nitrogen fixing blue green alga Anabaena azollae. Azolla fronds consist of sporophyte with a floating rhizome and small bi-lobed leaves and roots. Rice growing in South East Asia and other third World countries have recently been increased interest in use of the Azolla either as an alternate nitrogen sources as a supplement to commercial nitrogen fertilizers. Azolla is used as biofertilizer for wetland rice and it is known to use 40-60 kg N/ha per rice crop.




Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms(PSM)





Several soil bacteria and fungi, especially species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Penicillium, Aspergillus etc. secrete organic acids and lower the pH in their vicinity to bring phosphates in soil. Increased yields of wheat and potato were demonstrated due to inoculation of peat based cultures of Bacillus polymyxa and Pseudomonas striata.



AM fungi


 The transfer of nutrients mainly phosphorus and also zinc and sulphur from the soil to the cells of the root cortex is mediated by intracellular obligate fungal endosymbionts of the genera Glomus, Gigaspora, Acaulospora, Sclerocysts and Endogone which possess vesicles for storage of nutrients and arbuscles for funneling these nutrients into the root system. fixers.
                                                











Silicate solubilizing bacteria (SSB)
  Microorganisms are capable of degrading silicates and aluminum silicates. During the metabolism of microbes several organic acids are produced and these have a dual role in silicate weathering. They supply H+ ions to the medium and promote hydrolysis and the organic acids like citric, oxalic acid, Keto acids and hydroxy carbolic acids which from complexes with cations, promote their removal and retention in the medium in a dissolved state.









Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)
  The group of bacteria that colonize roots or rhizosphere soil and beneficial to crops are referred to as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR).
The PGPR inoculants currently commercialized that seem to promote growth through at least one mechanism; suppression of plant disease (termed Bioprotectants), improved nutrient acquisition (termed Biofertilizers), or phytohormone production (termed Biostimulants). Species of Pseudomonas and Bacillus can produce as yet not well characterized phytohormones or growth regulators that cause crops to have greater amounts of fine roots which have the effect of increasing the absorptive surface of plant roots for uptake of water and nutrients. These PGPR are referred to as Biostimulants and the phytohormones they produce include indole-acetic acid, cytokinins, gibberellins and inhibitors of ethylene production.
Recent advances in molecular techniques also are encouraging in that tools are becoming available to determine the mechanism by which crop performance is improved using PGPR and track survival and activity of PGPR organisms in soil and roots. The science of PGPR is at the stage where genetically modified PGPR can be produced. PGPR with antibiotic, phytohormone and siderophore production can be made.



Liquid Biofertilizers



  Biofertilizers are such as Rhizobium, Azospirillum and Phosphobacteria  provide nitrogen  and phosphorous nutrients to crop plants through nitrogen fixation and phosphorous solubilization processes. These Biofertilizers could be effectively utilized for rice, pulses, millets, cotton, sugarcane, vegetable and other horticulture crops. Biofertilizers  is one of the prime input in organic farming not only enhances the crop growth and yield but also improves the soil health and sustain soil fertility. At  present, Biofertilizers  are supplied to the farmers as carrier based  inoculants. As an alternative, liquid formulation technology has been developed in the Department of Agricultural  Microbiology, TNAU, Coimbatore which has more advantages than the carrier inoculants.

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